Affidavit of Support Form I-864 Checklist

As an affidavit, Form I-864 does not expire unless the sponsored person becomes a U.S. citizen, has worked in 40 work quarters in the United States (typically 10 years), or leaves the United States. If you have completed the entire form yourself and can confirm that you are reading and understanding English and all the questions asked, check box 1.a. If you ask an interpreter to read all the questions in your language, check box 1.b. and you will be asked to name him or her as a person in Part 9, and the interpreter must sign and date box 7.a. If someone else has answered all the questions about your application and based on the information you provided, check box 2. The creator must sign and date 8.a. By signing, they confirm, under penalty of perjury, that the information is complete and accurate based on the information provided by the sponsor. Part 3: Information about the immigrants you sponsor The rhetoric that immigrants come to the United States and are a burden on the system has existed in that country since the beginning of immigration. Form I-864, Affidavit of Support, is essentially a contract between a U.S.-based sponsor and the U.S. government where the sponsor promises that this will not happen.

By following Instructions I-864, the sponsor must demonstrate that the immigrant is not a burden and that the sponsor has the financial means to support it. This form can decide or break your petition, and this hope will help you take another step towards approval. As you prepare your support affidavit on CitizenPath, you will also receive a set of custom submission instructions for you. Based on your answers to questions on Form I-864, our software creates a custom set of instructions so that you know exactly what supporting documents you need to submit using Form I-864. Try it now. There are several types of support affidavit forms (I-864, I-864EZ, I-864W and I-864A). Detailed information on support affidavit requirements and forms is available on the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) website. Here you will also find answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs). Use the information in these FAQs and on this webpage with, and not instead, the detailed instructions for the support affidavit forms on the USCIS website. 3. The income you use to qualify is based solely on your salary or pension and is shown on one or more W-2 forms provided by your employer or former employer (your employers).

Boundless has created a guide to find out if you reach the minimum annual income for a wedding-based green card, where you can learn more. You may also be able to meet income requirements by hiring a co-sponsor. Find out how Boundless can help you with the forms required for your green card application and simplify the process for you. No, the form does not expire and is considered “indefinite” from the moment the sponsor signs it. There is no filing fee for I-864 filing with USCIS. For more information on processing fees, please see the U.S. Department of State (DOS) filing at www.travel.state.gov. By signing Form I-864, the petitioner (including all co-sponsors) agrees to use his or her resources to provide financial support to the recipient and all dependents, if any. If the recipient and dependents receive certain public benefits based on a federal, state, or local means test, the agency providing the service will, under U.S. law, request a refund from the I-864 signatory. When you file Form I-864, it is important that you complete the correct form.

Note: NVC officers cannot tell you which support affidavit form to complete. Don`t forget to sign your form. We will reject any unsigned form. NOTE: Please read the following information very carefully. If you do not complete and submit the correct form(s), the processing of your file will be delayed. Please do not submit this checklist with your Form I-864. This is an optional tool that you can use when preparing your form, but it does not replace legal, regulatory, and form instructions. We recommend that you review these requirements before completing and submitting your form. Do not send original documents unless the instructions on the form or the applicable regulations expressly require it.

While exact receipts may vary depending on the case, all promoters must submit the following: You must also ensure that you have submitted the latest version of the form, which is available from USCIS. At Boundless, we can help you be reassured and review your green card application. Most family immigrants and some employed immigrants use this form to show that they have adequate financial support options and are unlikely to depend on financial support from the U.S. government. In the first section of the form, you must determine why you are submitting the affidavit. If you are the petitioner and you are filing it for your related immigrant, check box 1.a. If you submitted a foreign work permit on behalf of your parent, check box 1.b. and indicate how your relationship with them is. If you have submitted a foreigner`s permit for the immigrant parent, but you do not employ them personally, but you are responsible for more than 5%, check box 1.c. If you are one of the two or the only co-sponsor, select the 1.d. or 1.e. field.

If the original applicant has died and is acting as alternate sponsor, check box 1.f. Form I-864 is available through the Consular Electronic Application Centre. You can also submit it directly to USCIS with your I-130 or I-129F and send it to the USCIS Chicago locker. The National Visa Centre (NVC) will review all affidavits submitted to ensure they are complete. If the form is not completed, the NVC sends a message to the CEIC asking the applicant to correct the form and then resubmit it. It is recommended that you complete the Affidavit of Support, with all responses entered in capital letters and submitted with the relevant supporting documents. There is no charge if the sponsored immigrant submits this form to USCIS or abroad to the Department of State (DOS). However, DOS charges a fee when they file in the U.S. …





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